Bolognese Sauce

 

What you will need:

 

  • 16 large red tomatoes, stems removed (you can substitute with 4-8 cans stewed tomatoes but it just isn’t the same)
  • 2 small yellow onions, chopped
  • ½ cup bell peppers or 4 baby bell peppers, chopped (I will usually by a bag of the baby bell peppers, they typically last for a full week and I can us a couple at a time without cutting a half large pepper and wasting the rest, plus they are great to snack on)
  • 3 celery stalks, chopped
  • 9 baby bella mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 large carrot, shredded
  • 6 large cloves of garlic, chopped
  • ¼ cup fresh basil (2 tbsp. dried can be substituted)
  • ¼ cup fresh oregano (2 tbsp. dried can be substituted)
  • 1 tbsp. dried oregano for ground beef seasoning
  • 1 lb. ground hamburger meat (80/20)-if you want get creative ground lamb or veal gives a great flavor
  • 4 links hot Italian sausage (you can use mild or sweet if you prefer) – Remove sausage from the casing, and crumble
  • Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO)
  • 1 cup red wine (I typically keep a bottle of cheap red wine in the kitchen, works great as a base for a sauce with steak)
  • Salt and Pepper (I prefer kosher salt, the crystals are larger and helps to stop you from over salting food)

 

**Caveman Tip: I like to make this sauce on a Saturday or Sunday because it leaves me with great leftovers for a lunch and dinner during the week. Not only that but I am able to freeze some of the left over sauce for some quick and easy pasta meals the next week.

 

Prepare – grill style

 

Heat the grill to low heat.  We’re staying with propane on this one; it’s just quicker and less messy.  Remove stems from all 16 tomatoes and cut them in half.  Brush with EVOO, salt and pepper.  Once grill is warm, place the halved tomatoes cut side down on well-oiled grill for about 5 minutes or until soft. They should have some char marks but not burnt.   **Caveman Tip: Grilling the tomatoes not only makes them easier to peel for our sauce, but it also gives them that caveman zest!  Removing the skin from the tomatoes helps to reduce the bitter flavor.

 

 When tomatoes are warm, remove them from grill and let cool.   Once the tomatoes are cool, remove the skin.  

 

Prepare the base

 

In a large stock pan, coat with EVOO and begin to sauté the onions, bell peppers, carrot, garlic, and celery over medium heat.  Add 2 tsp. of salt and 1 tsp. of pepper.  Sauté until almost soft, then go ahead and add the baby bella mushrooms and fresh basil (or dried). Sauté until everything is soft and smelling good.  Remove entire mixture from pan (do not get rid the pan’s leftover goodness!) and put into a large bowl. 

 

 Cook

 

 Using the same stock pan (with the leftover goodness) add a small amount of EVOO to coat the pan and on medium high heat, add the ground hamburger meat (or veal or lamb). Season the meat with salt, pepper, dried oregano and brown it.  Remove the meat from the pan and place in the same bowl as your sautéed base mixture.  There might be a little liquid in the pan just dump that but don’t scrape it you want all those bits and pieces to carry over to the next process

 

 Add another thin layer of EVOO to the bottom of the pan and add the crumbled hot Italian sausage, brown it over medium high heat.  You will begin to see goodness on the bottom of the pan…that’s all Bolognese goodness flavors for later!  Once it’s brown remove the sausage from the pan and add it to the bowl containing your other ingredients. 

 

 Still on medium heat, pour the red wine into the same pan.  Deglaze the pan.  (Use a metal spatula to scrape all the ‘sausage goodness’ off the bottom of the pan & into the liquid).  Continue to cook until the wine has reduced by half.   (This only takes a few minutes)

 

While your wine is reducing remove the core from your tomatoes.  (the core is the white tough membrane located in the middle of your tomatoes. I just pull it out with my hands) Then, chop your tomatoes.  **Caveman Tip: I like to use a food processor to chop my tomatoes on a pulse setting for a few seconds.  Though it’s one extra thing to clean, but it saves a big mess for cavewoman to clean up.

 

 Once the wine has reduced, add your chopped tomatoes to the large stock pan.  Combine your (base) vegetable mixture, hamburger, and sausage to the pan.  At this time, go ahead and add your oregano.  Bring mixture to a rolling boil (this is not a fierce boil, but more of a light boil).    Once boiling, reduce heat to medium and simmer stirring occasionally.

 

Simmer, and let the flavors “marry”

 

 At this point, the goal is to let the liquid reduce.  This can take 1-2 hours.  I like to keep it over a medium to medium low heat stirring occasionally. You don’t want the solid ingredients to burn on the bottom of the pan; it will result in a bitter flavor to your sauce.   **Caveman Tip:  If you are familiar with my recipes or my style, you know what I’m going to say here…Frequently taste your liquid mixture and make sure you like the flavor.  Just remember this flavor will take a while to start developing

 

 It will take about an hour for the meat and vegetable flavors to ‘marry’ into the sauce and begin to sweeten it up.  After this point – you can add ingredients as needed for your liking (be aware of salt if eating this sauce with noodles or parmesan cheese!  There is plenty of salt in those 2 items) Pepper, dried oregano or basil depending on your preference. If you like a little sweeter sauce, add a tablespoon of brown sugar or honey but be careful not to add too much because as it cooks for the last hour the sausage, carrots and onions will continue to sweeten the sauce.

 

If you like more of a tomato flavor in your sauce (after you’ve simmered an hour), feel free to add a tablespoon of tomato paste.  I prefer that fresh flavor, so I steer away from this. Plus – most cavemen like meat – and we are looking for that wonderful essence in a Bolognese sauce.

 

 Continue to simmer mixture up to another hour, tasting occasionally.  If you feel the sauce is too thick, you can add a little vegetable stock to thin it out; but most likely it will need to reduce more.   

 

 Once your kitchen smells amazing and your sauce tastes marvelous, it’s ready to eat.  I like to pour over pasta, but you can get creative depending on what you’re making it for.  Always taste your sauce and make sure you like it before serving it to others!!

 

I like to take the leftovers and put them in individual containers and freeze them; this allows me to pull out a portion at a time when I want a quick meal.

 

 **Side Note: To make things a little interesting sometimes I like to add a cup of store bought salsa to the sauce it gives the dish a little southwest flare to mix things up.

 

 

 

 

Homemade Barbecue Sauce

 

What you will need:

  • 2 tbsp. chili powder
  • 1 tbsp. ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp. table salt
  • 2 cups ketchup
  • ½ cup yellow ballpark style mustard
  • ½ cup apple cider vinegar
  • ⅓ cup Worcestershire sauce
  • ¼ cup  lime juice
  • ¼ cup A1 steak sauce
  • ¼ cup dark molasses
  • ¼ cup Agave nectar or regular honey
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar (or light if that’s all you have)
  • 1 tsp. liquid smoke
  • 1 tbsp. Memphis Rub (from above)
  • 1 tsp. cayenne pepper (can omit or try a hot sauce if you like)
  • 1 tbsp. red pepper chili flakes (can omit if you don’t like that much heat)

 

  • Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well.  Cover and store in refrigerator until ready to use.
  • Heat over medium heat prior to using for best flavor.

**Caveman Tip:  I prefer to prepare the BBQ sauce the night before you use it, as it allows all the flavors ample time to blend resulting in the ultimate savory BBQ sauce.

 

Bolognese a la Caveman

What you will need:

  • 16 large red tomatoes, stems removed (you can substitute with 4-8 cans stewed tomatoes but it just isn’t the same)
  • 2 small yellow onions, chopped
  • ½ cup bell peppers or 4 baby bell peppers, chopped (I will usually by a bag of the baby bell peppers, they typically last for a full week and I can us a couple at a time without cutting a half large pepper and wasting the rest, plus they are great to snack on) 
  • 3 celery stalks, chopped
  • 9 baby bella mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 large carrot, shredded
  • 6 large cloves of garlic, chopped
  • ¼ cup fresh basil (2 tbsp. dried can be substituted)
  • ¼ cup fresh oregano (2 tbsp. dried can be substituted)
  • 1 tbsp. dried oregano for ground beef seasoning
  • 1 lb. ground hamburger meat (80/20)-if you want get creative ground lamb or veal gives a great flavor
  • 4 links hot Italian sausage (you can use mild or sweet if you prefer) – Remove sausage from the casing, and crumble
  • 1 lb.  dry spaghetti
  • Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO)
  • 1 cup red wine (I typically keep a bottle of cheap red wine in the kitchen, works great as a base for a sauce with steak)
  • Salt and Pepper (I prefer kosher salt, the crystals are larger and helps to stop you from over salting food)
  • Shredded Parmesan Cheese (I typically buy a fresh block and store in airtight container in your fridge and it will last a long time)

**Caveman Tip: I like to make this sauce on a Saturday or Sunday because it leaves me with great leftovers for a lunch and dinner during the week. Not only that but I am able to freeze some of the left over sauce for some quick and easy pasta meals the next week.

Prepare – grill style

Heat the grill to low heat.  We’re staying with propane on this one; it’s just quicker and less messy.  Remove stems from all 16 tomatoes and cut them in half.  Brush with EVOO, salt and pepper.  Once grill is warm, place the halved tomatoes cut side down on well-oiled grill for about 5 minutes or until soft. They should have some char marks but not burnt.   **Caveman Tip: Grilling the tomatoes not only makes them easier to peel for our sauce, but it also gives them that caveman zest!  Removing the skin from the tomatoes helps to reduce the bitter flavor.

When tomatoes are warm, remove them from grill and let cool.   Once the tomatoes are cool, remove the skin.

Prepare the base

In a large stock pan, coat with EVOO and begin to sauté the onions, bell peppers, carrot, garlic, and celery over medium heat.  Add 2 tsp. of salt and 1 tsp. of pepper.  Sauté until almost soft, then go ahead and add the baby bella mushrooms and fresh basil (or dried). Sauté until everything is soft and smelling good.  Remove entire mixture from pan (do not get rid the pan’s leftover goodness!) and put into a large bowl.

Cook

Using the same stock pan (with the leftover goodness) add a small amount of EVOO to coat the pan and on medium high heat, add the ground hamburger meat (or veal or lamb). Season the meat with salt, pepper, dried oregano and brown it.  Remove the meat from the pan and place in the same bowl as your sautéed base mixture.  There might be a little liquid in the pan just dump that but don’t scrape it you want all those bits and pieces to carry over to the next process.

Add another thin layer of EVOO to the bottom of the pan and add the crumbled hot Italian sausage, brown it over medium high heat.  You will begin to see goodness on the bottom of the pan…that’s all Bolognese goodness flavors for later!  Once it’s brown remove the sausage from the pan and add it to the bowl containing your other ingredients.

Still on medium heat, pour the red wine into the same pan.  Deglaze the pan.  (Use a metal spatula to scrape all the ‘sausage goodness’ off the bottom of the pan & into the liquid).  Continue to cook until the wine has reduced by half.   (This only takes a few minutes)

While your wine is reducing remove the core from your tomatoes.  (the core is the white tough membrane located in the middle of your tomatoes. I just pull it out with my hands) Then, chop your tomatoes.  **Caveman Tip: I like to use a food processor to chop my tomatoes on a pulse setting for a few seconds.  Though it’s one extra thing to clean, but it saves a big mess for cavewoman to clean up.

Once the wine has reduced, add your chopped tomatoes to the large stock pan.  Combine your (base) vegetable mixture, hamburger, and sausage to the pan.  At this time, go ahead and add your oregano.  Bring mixture to a rolling boil (this is not a fierce boil, but more of a light boil).    Once boiling, reduce heat to medium and simmer stirring occasionally.

At this point, the goal is to let the liquid reduce.  This can take a while….1-2 hours.  I like to keep it over a medium to medium low heat stirring occasionally. You don’t want the solid ingredients to burn on the bottom of the pan; it will result in a bitter flavor to your sauce.   **Caveman Tip:  If you are familiar with my recipes or my style, you know what I’m going to say here…Frequently taste your liquid mixture and make sure you like the flavor.  Just remember this flavor will take a while to start developing.

It will take about an hour for the meat and vegetable flavors to ‘marry’ into the sauce and begin to sweeten it up.  After this point – you can add ingredients as needed for your liking (salt, be careful with the salt as the noodles and parmesan will add salt to the completed dish) pepper, dried oregano or basil depending on your preference. If you like a little sweeter sauce, add a tablespoon of brown sugar or honey but be careful not to add too much because as it cooks for the last hour the sausage, carrots and onions will continue to sweeten the sauce.

If you like more of a tomato flavor in your sauce (after you’ve simmered an hour), feel free to add a tablespoon of tomato paste.  I prefer that fresh flavor, so I steer away from this. Plus – most cavemen like meat – and we are looking for that wonderful essence in a Bolognese sauce.

Continue to simmer mixture up to another hour, tasting occasionally.  If you feel the sauce is too thick, you can add a little vegetable stock to thin it out; but most likely it will need to reduce more.

As your sauce is cooking to consistency, go ahead and get out a pot to boil your spaghetti noodles. **Caveman Tip: Always salt you water when boiling any noodles, it adds great flavor to the noodle. (Taste the water as it gets warm and you should be able to taste the salt.) General rule of thumb is 1 tbsp. per quart of water.

Bring water to boil and add your spaghetti noodles.  Do Not Overcook The Noodles! **See next Caveman Tip.

**Caveman Tip:  Here’s the difference between restaurant quality and subpar.  Taste your noodles.  Pull them from the water while still al-dente. (Al-dente means flexible noodle, but still firm to the taste, it will definitely taste like it needs to cook a little longer)  Place the noodles in a large skillet under medium heat.  Ladle in Bolognese sauce capturing a lot of liquid from your sauce. This will finish cooking the noodles in the sauce while giving them that great flavor. Continue to mix and stir pasta in the mixture until pasta has cooked to desired consistency.

Plate Bolognese and top with shredded parmesan and fresh parsley.  I like to serve it with a small salad or garlic buttered bread.

**Side Note: To make things a little interesting sometimes I like to reheat the sauce with a little added store bought salsa, it gives the dish a little southwest flare to mix things up.

 

 

 

Food Storage Tips

If there is one thing that I really hate, it’s buying an ingredient to cook a meal with and then watching it spoil and go to waste within a couple of days; usually because I don’t have anything to use it for again. We all love using fresh ingredients and definitely know that they make meals hit that next level. So here are a few staple items that I pick up at the store every week that go with a lot of the meals I cook. Here are Caveman’s Tips on how to make those ingredients last long enough to get your money’s worth out of them.

Onions:

Onions are an item I use in a lot of dishes, soups, sauces, rice, other sides and salads. I like yellow onions as they get that sweet caramelized flavor when sautéed.  I will also pick up a red onion, as I prefer them in the raw state in my Mexican dishes. A taco night or burrito night is pretty common in my house, it makes for a quick, easy and tasty meal after work.

 

I tend to not over buy onions, but if stored in a dark cool dry area they can last weeks. The only drawback is that most recipes only end up using about a half an onion. What I like to do is chop the whole onion, use what I need, and then store the remainder in an airtight container in the fridge. It will easily last several days, as I mentioned most of my meals include an onion in one way or another.

Another option is the shallot, it is a smaller version of the onion and a bit more potent, but when sautéed with oil and salt, it also turns sweet. The thing I like about the shallot is that they are smaller and will allow you to use only what you need without wasting half. They are a bit more expensive though. Shallots should be stored in the same way as the onion which is a dark cool dry environment such as a panty; you don’t want them to start sprouting.

Fresh and Easy sells onions and shallots in mesh bags; this works good to hang in your kitchen or pantry which stops any mold from accumulating on the bottom of the onion. Just screw a small hook in your pantry.

Celery:

Celery is another one of those items that adds great flavor and texture to soups, sauces, rice, side dishes, salads, and I just eat it as a snack. (I know celery is not “traditional” caveman style but come on guys! I want to be able to enjoy life with my cavewoman and delicious food well into my 70’s & 80’s…I don’t want to die of a heart attack at 50! So, occasionally, snacking on celery at work or just sitting around the house isn’t such a bad idea.  Just sayin’…)

Now, I like to buy the celery that has been trimmed, washed and packaged (you will still want to wash prior to use).  This celery seems to last me at least 7 days in the vegetable drawer of the fridge. I have bought this at most grocery stores.

This type of celery tends to be a little more expensive than just the normal celery bunches so if you are on a budget, and believe me there are weeks the caveman is on a budget, pick those up instead.  Make sure you look through them for condition and cleanliness.  Do not just grab the first one available; usually the grocery stores will put the new stock in the back so don’t be afraid to dig in there.  Look for really green and healthy-looking celery and particularly look at the leaves.  You want to find celery where the leaves haven’t tuned brown and the stalks aren’t bruised. You want bright, fresh, and green. Grab those.

When you get home you need to decide how to store them.  The method I have read about simply said to wrap the celery in foil and store it in the vegetable drawer. Me personally, I don’t want to waste the tin foil, that stuff is not cheap. I like to clean, cut, and trim my celery when I get home.  Then, I place it in a jar or plastic pitcher of water as seen in the picture. (I pilfered this picture off the internet as I currently have the prepackaged celery in my refrigerator.) You want to then cover the top with a plastic bag, (one you brought home from the grocery store will do just fine) and put it over the top of the pitcher and seal with string or a rubber band. This will allow the celery to last at least a week.  Just pull off the plastic when you need celery, and re-attach to store.

Carrots:

Again, carrots are another one of those items that adds great flavor to soups, sauces, rice, side dishes, salads and I eat it as a snack. Carrots are very versatile and will store for over a week in the fridge. I prefer to buy the packages of pre-cut and peeled carrots, they are just that much easier to work with and make great snacks.

If you want to go the raw unprocessed carrots I have heard this is the best method. You will want to trim all but 2” of the green off the top of the carrot, do not peel or cut anything else on the carrot. Put the carrots in an airtight container and store in the vegetable drawer of the fridge, they will last at least a week.

Mushrooms:

I never used to like mushrooms but recently, I have really acquired a taste for them. They add that deep earthy flavor to salads or a sweet mild earth flavor when sautéed over chicken or steak. I really like using them in sauces and gravy for steak, chicken, and mashed potatoes. I even like making stuffed mushrooms as a tasty appetizer. (Check out my Chicken with Mushroom Gravy recipe or the Stroganoff that I really enjoy.)

There a many types of mushrooms used for cooking, and I prefer the portabella. It typically has an earthy meaty flavor but if you prefer a milder flavor, try your standard white mushroom. (I do typically keep a package of dried shitake mushrooms in the panty, because I really love Asian foods, I can rehydrate them as necessary when I cook an Asian dish)

Keeping mushrooms can be tricky but if done right they can be stored up to a week.  Choose those mushrooms with a firm texture and even color with tightly-closed caps. If the gills are showing, it’s an indication of age, and they are probably past their prime. Discolored, broken and damaged mushrooms with soft spots should be avoided. I prefer to store them in a brown paper bag.  I usually get one form the store when I do my weekly shopping trip.  Do not wash them!  In fact, pat dry if they are wet from the store, put a layer of mushrooms in the bottom of the brown paper bag, don’t overcrowd them to the point they are all touching.  If you have more, place a paper towel down to separate the layers. Loosely fold the top of the paper bag as you want the air to be able to get in the bag and place in the crisper section of the fridge. If you picked good ones they should last. **Caveman Tip: never wash mushrooms, they are like a sponge and will absorb liquid and become soggy.  Just brush the dirt off with either a soft vegetable brush or a paper towel

Not only have I given some insight to the things any regular person should have in their fridge on a weekly basis, but I’ve also shared how to keep them fresh and get the most bang for your buck.  I really hope this helps.  Feel free to let us know by posting your thoughts.

 

 

Down Under Wine and Bistro

Restaurant Reviews By:    Cavewoman

Restaurant:  DownUnder Wine Bistro

Location:  Gilbert, AZ, Strip Mall

Day & time visited: Friday Night, 6pm

Reservations:  We made one but I don’t think you need one.

 

 

We visited a local bistro, Down Under Wines and Bistro, on a Friday night for date night.  As we parked in the parking lot, we were not sold on “curb appearance,” as the strip mall it’s located in seemed a bit deserted; however, we were pleasantly surprised once we went inside.  The place was unexpectedly busy, and customers appeared to be having a great time.  The hostess was very friendly, and the atmosphere was “happy hour enjoyable.” I would not describe DownUnder as a lavish sit-down dinner place.

 

We started with drinks.  I was impressed with the wine list, as they listed wines from Australia to Chile, with a variety of reds and whites alike.  The wine pricing was certainly fair.  I ordered the Boxhead Shiraz, from Australia which had a blackberry, raspberry and plum flavor, with a peppery spice.  Just like me!  The caveman (not being the wine-type) attempted to order the 22oz. Vetlins Pilsner, right off the menu, but was told “we do not have that in-house.”  So, our waiter quickly suggested a similar standby Pilsner.  Caveman seemed to enjoy this beer as he had more than 1…so, no hard feelings there!  I do feel the need to mention that beyond wines, the beer menu is limited and cocktail menu is almost non-existent.

 

The menu was very cool, listing a range of tapas and the option to build your own cheese and meat plates to go along with the wine.  I could definitely see myself going back with my girlfriends for a wine happy hour night.  That said, we decided to order a couple of the house appetizers.  We chose the Crocodile Kabobs and the Chef’s Choice Bruschetta.

 

The crocodile bites were respectable, a gamey meat in nature, but served with a sweet flavored BBQ sauce that took the meat to the next level.  The meat resembled pieces of sausage, sliced and served on a skewer with grilled red onions and green bell peppers.  The kabob was placed over a bed of white rice and drizzled with the aforementioned sauce.  I, personally, am not a fan of gamey meat, so I would probably not order the crocodile bites again; however Caveman liked it! Although, for $9 he thought the portions were a little skimpy.  Before I get to our review of the Chef’s Choice Bruschetta, I feel I should mention that they had a “Specials Board” with several of the day’s most popular sellers and tasty suggestions listed for different categories (i.e. desserts, fresh fish, daily wines, entrees, cheeses, etc). However, our waiter never once mentioned any specials once we sat down.  We found that to be odd.

Now onto the Chef’s Choice Bruschetta…. It was delivered to the table by a “food runner” and  it appeared  to be a slightly brown cheese-fluff mixture sitting atop a thick slice of toasted sourdough.  We immediately asked what was the topping on the bruschetta made of.  She had to run back to the kitchen to ask.  At that time, our waiter approached and informed us it consisted of a cream cheese, bacon and sriracha mixture on toasted sourdough.  Okay, (pause to let this information sink in)…Initial thoughts included, “interesting…” “I love all those ingredients!” “This should be yummy”… So needless to say, I was expecting heaven on a piece of sourdough.  Unfortunately, what I experienced was more like a cheap, disappointing cheese-whiz spread on too much bread.  It had a little spice,  and that’s the best I can say.  We were charged $7 for this chef’s concoction and needless to say it was nothing special…nor is it anything I’d eat ever again.

 

On to our entrees:  Caveman ordered the Kangaroo Loin.  I mean, how often can one say they ate a kangaroo loin?  I went with the Seared Barramundi, for the lighter fare.  The waiter suggested Caveman order the Kangaroo loin as “rare as he can take it” so he went with medium rare.  The loin was delivered in a timely manner and was served thinly sliced with grilled Portobello mushrooms and a port reduction sauce, topped with 3 crispy fried onion rings, over a bed of rice.  The portion was enough to feed my caveman, overall  an exotic dish for $15. The kangaroo was tender with a good sear and great flavor.  The port reduction sauce complimented the dish well; still, the one regret he did have, was not ordering it rare.  When dealing with steak, caveman likes an appropriately cooked medium to medium rare, but one thing we learned – kangaroo is not steak.  Order it rare!  At this time, we were both due for another Boxhead Shiraz and Pilsner.

As mentioned, I got the seared barramundi.  Upon my first glance, I could immediately tell that barramundi must belong to the sea bass family, as it was a light pink and beautiful fish.  I received a fist sized piece of fish with the skin on and a nice sear, but it was not crispy.  The barramundi had nice pink coloring around the edges and was flakey in the most delicious way.  My plate was filled with color, with a lemongrass vin blanc sauce around the edges, and some type of garlic sauce approaching the fish. It was served over a nest of spinach and leek rice, all booming with wonderful flavors when eaten together. It was well worth the $14 and I would definitely order it again, recommending  you do the same.  The portion size was adequate, especially after our appetizer experience.  Sadly, we did not save room for dessert, so no review on that portion.  The wine was sweet enough.

 

On a scale of 1-10, 1 being poor, 5 being mediocre, and 10 being the best experience I can describe, here is how I rate the following for DownUnder Wine & Bistro:

 

Atmosphere – 7     Service -7     Appetizers- 3     Food-8     Drinks -6